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Tag : water quality

By Ian Rankine

Today is World Water Monitoring Day

What is World Water Monitoring Day?

Everyone knows that water is an absolute essential for life*.

In this country, by far the majority of us are able to access clean, fresh water whenever we need, simply by turning on a tap.  But that is most certainly not the case for the majority of people on earth.  In 2003, the Clean Water Foundation in America established the first World Water Monitoring Day.

Water Monitoring Day was established to encourage and educate people on how to monitor the components of the water in their local area. Water pollution is a serious problem, and learning how to identify, take care of, and prevent it is more important with every passing year.

Associated with World Water Monitoring Day is the World Water Monitoring Challenge (now called the EarthEcho Water Challenge). The Challenge encourages people across the world to:

  1. Test their water to find out the state of the water quality in your home or area
  2. Share the data, photos and stories in an online, worldwide database
  3. Protect your local water supplies, now that you know the state of your water supply, and how it compares with others around the world.

For 20 years, 4T has been doing our bit – testing and monitoring the surface water and groundwater of Queensland. Consequently, we’ve built up a pretty good database of water quality and its changes over time.  Other organisations, such as the Fitzroy Basin Association, have also contributed immensely to our knowledge of the water ecosystems in Central Queensland.

What can you do to help?

On World Water Monitoring Day, stop for a moment and consider what small things you could do in your everyday life to help protect our water.  It is so easy for those of us in developed economies to take it for granted, but we need to remember – always – that water is a finite resource.

Here’s some ideas to get you started.

If you’ve got some ideas to share, post your photos and stories on social media using @MonitorWater #MonitorWater.

 

*Water has been detected on Saturn’s moon Enceladus, and to avoid the possibility of contaminating any potential life, the spacecraft Cassini was directed into Saturn’s atmosphere to burn up.

By Ian Rankine

Wow – Where did that time go? An update on blue green algae treatment.

It’s been quite a while since we posted something here – didn’t realise how fast the time went!  We’re happy to report that 4T has been very busy lately,  so blog posting slipped down the job list a bit.

Back in March, we wrote a post “Solving pollution with more pollution”, which introduced a new way to treat algal blooms from our colleague Dr Simon Tannock. Simon contacted us again just recently to share the results of the latest Queensland trials of Diatomix with Council and Utility clients.  To say that the results have been spectacular is an understatement.

If you are interested in seeing the full presentation that Simon has shared with us, it can be downloaded here.

Download the Diatomix Trial Results Presentation

Ian Rankine

18th October 2016

By Ian Rankine

Surface Water Quality Training Workshops – Good decisions need good data

It’s been a busy week for Ian, Christina and Jeanie, with two surface water quality training workshops in two days – one in Emerald and one in Theodore.

Having Christina and Jeanie present was a bit like “getting the old band back together again”, as it was Christina and Jeanie who delivered the very first surface water quality workshops way back in 2005.

The course has undergone some changes over the subsequent 11 years, but it still has the same purpose:

  • to help people to understand the importance of water quality, and how we measure and assess quality
  • to ensure that every sample taken is accurate, reliable and repeatable.

Decisions made on water samples can have very long-term consequences

We know that the water quality sampling that we, and our trainees, perform is used for making important and expensive planning and management decisions.

Decisions that can have very long-term effects on our water ecosystems.

So it’s important that sampling techniques are correct, and that people taking samples understand exactly why they are doing so.

A mixed group of students

The attendees were a mixed group, with landholders, mine and industrial site enviros, council employees and private industry represented.

We even had two trainees who travelled all the way from Innisfail to attend.  Hopefully they will take their new knowledge back to North Queensland and apply it to water monitoring in their own area.

Thanks to Fitzroy Basin Association (FBA), Central Highlands Regional Resources Use Planning Cooperative (CHRRUP) and the Dawson Catchment Coordinating Association (DCCA) for their support and hosting these workshops.

Thanks also to the Australian Agricultural College Emerald Campus for allowing us to use their training room.

Many of the trainees have requested additional training in specific areas, so we’ll have to get busy designing some additional courses over the next few months.

 

 

Today is World Water Monitoring Day
Wow – Where did that time go? An update on blue green algae treatment.
Surface Water Quality Training Workshops – Good decisions need good data